This course covers the following topics:

1 – White Blood Cells, by Dr. Sigurdson

This session focuses on the origin, maturation and function of the myeloid and lymphoid white blood cells. Normal and reactive morphology as well as leukemias are examined. There is a review of the principles involved in the automated differential.

 

2 & 3 – Red Blood Cells, by Dr. Scott

2-Red blood cells play a vital role in the transport of oxygen.  Disease states such as anemia and genetic abnormalities of hemoglobin may affect this function and result in distinct morphological changes. Normal and abnormal morphology will be examined and related to abnormalities in the red cell indices.

3-Thalassemia and Anemias

 

4 - Hemostasis, by Dr. Krisinger

Hemostasis is a perfect balance between blood clot formation and fibrinolysis.  This session describes the biochemical interplay required to protect the body from catastrophic blood loss upon injury while maintaining the fluidity of blood at sites remote from injury. Imbalances can lead to thrombosis or bleeding. Techniques for the investigation of routine coagulation tests will be covered as well.

 

5 - Blood Platelets and Transfusion Science, by Dr. Schubert

Platelets play an important role in blood clotting and wound repair. This session covers basic platelet biology as well as highlights of recent scientific discoveries. Platelet functions and their analyses will be discussed especially in the light of platelet disorders. Scientific approaches will be introduced to address current challenges in blood banking affecting transfusion medicine.

 

6 – Fluid Morphology, by Dr. Manna

This session will review various fluids which are analyzed in the hematology lab and these include CSF, peritoneal, pericardial, pleural and synovial fluids.  The focus will be on cell counts and morphology and the two main objectives are: to be able to identify and differentiate among benign cells; and be able to screen for infections as well as hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies.

 

7 – Quality Assurance in the Hematology Lab, by Kin Cheng / Jim Yakimec

To ensure quality of the service provided by the laboratory, it must satisfy the needs of the ordering physicians, patients and the regulatory agency. Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) defined twelve building blocks that are essential for a quality management system. These essential building blocks must be applied across the path of workflow, from pre-examination, examination to post-examination.

Before a new instrument or methodology is introduced in the laboratory, it must be properly evaluated to validate its performance specifications. Once it is placed into clinical use, quality control tools are applied to ensure accuracy and precision of the reported results.  The final piece in a quality assurance scheme is to ensure the clients receive the results in a timely fashion.

This course covers the following topics:

1 – Water and Electrolytes, by Dr. Pudek

Review the distribution and physiological mechanisms regulating water, sodium and potassium. Common pathological conditions such as hyponatremia, hypernatremia, hypokalemia and hyperkalemia illustrated with brief case histories will be discussed.

 

 2 – Disorders of Glucose Metabolism, by Dr. Pudek

The metabolism and regulation of glucose will be reviewed. The causes, clinical features and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia will be examined and the abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism will be illustrated with case examples.

 

 3 – Evaluation of Acid Base Status, by Dr. Schreiber

Measurements of acid-base status are used to diagnose and monitor patients with a wide variety of conditions.  Values for pH, pCO2 and HCO3- allow one to determine which acid-base disorder (if any) is present.  The specific cause of an acid-base disorder can usually be diagnosed from a combination of history, physical exam and additional lab tests.  This talk will briefly review acid-base physiology, and then discuss how laboratory data are interpreted to give a clinically meaningful result.

 

 4 – Lipoprotein Metabolism, by Dr. Holmes

The basic aspects of lipoprotein metabolism will be discussed along with fundamentals of the analytical methods employed for each. Cases will be used to highlight the clinical utility of routine and esoteric lipoprotein analysis. Novel cardiovascular biomarkers will be briefly reviewed with emphasis on C reactive protein.

 

 

 5 – Therapeutic Drug Monitoring & Toxicology, by Dr. Cleve

A few “rules of thumb” and basic concepts to help you give more useful answers to therapeutic drug level requests and keep you out of trouble with toxicology.

 

 6 – Understanding Medical Laboratory Quality, by Dr. Noble

Modern view of Quality in the medical laboratory still begins with Quality Control but no longer ends there.  Today the arena of Quality extends to a full discussion of Quality Assessment, Quality Management, Continual Improvement, Quality Partners, Quality Costs and Quality Culture.  It is through our efforts and energy to ensure Quality that we can meet the needs of our patients, our colleagues and our profession.

 

 7 – Kidney Function Tests, Urinalysis and Urinalysis Case Histories,

            by Dr. Pudek

 

In this session the physiological function of the kidney, common disorders of the kidney and the role of renal function tests in assessing kidney disease will be examined. The components of routine urinalysis will also be reviewed. The laboratory assessment of renal disease will be reviewed using case examples.

 

 8 – Clinical Enzymology & Biomarkers of Cardiac Injury.

Cardiac Markers: Myocardial Infarction, by Dr. Pudek

The general properties of enzymes and how they are measured will be reviewed. The sources, clinical use and methods of measurement of alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, amylase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, creatine kinase and lipase will be discussed. Case histories will be utilized to illustrate the application of clinical Enzymology.

In part 2 of this the role of troponin I and T as markers of cardiac injury including myocardial infarction will be reviewed


This course covers the following topics:

1 – Water and Electrolytes, by Dr. Pudek

Review the distribution and physiological mechanisms regulating water, sodium and potassium. Common pathological conditions such as hyponatremia, hypernatremia, hypokalemia and hyperkalemia illustrated with brief case histories will be discussed.

 

 2 – Disorders of Glucose Metabolism, by Dr. Pudek

The metabolism and regulation of glucose will be reviewed. The causes, clinical features and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia will be examined and the abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism will be illustrated with case examples.

 

 3 – Evaluation of Acid Base Status, by Dr. Schreiber

Measurements of acid-base status are used to diagnose and monitor patients with a wide variety of conditions.  Values for pH, pCO2and HCO3- allow one to determine which acid-base disorder (if any) is present.  The specific cause of an acid-base disorder can usually be diagnosed from a combination of history, physical exam and additional lab tests.  This talk will briefly review acid-base physiology, and then discuss how laboratory data are interpreted to give a clinically meaningful result.

 

 4 – Lipoprotein Metabolism, by Dr. Holmes

The basic aspects of lipoprotein metabolism will be discussed along with fundamentals of the analytical methods employed for each. Cases will be used to highlight the clinical utility of routine and esoteric lipoprotein analysis. Novel cardiovascular biomarkers will be briefly reviewed with emphasis on C reactive protein.

 

 

 5 – Therapeutic Drug Monitoring & Toxicology, by Dr. Cleve

A few “rules of thumb” and basic concepts to help you give more useful answers to therapeutic drug level requests and keep you out of trouble with toxicology.

 

 6 – Understanding Medical Laboratory Quality, by Dr. Noble

Modern view of Quality in the medical laboratory still begins with Quality Control but no longer ends there.  Today the arena of Quality extends to a full discussion of Quality Assessment, Quality Management, Continual Improvement, Quality Partners, Quality Costs and Quality Culture.  It is through our efforts and energy to ensure Quality that we can meet the needs of our patients, our colleagues and our profession.

 

 7 – Kidney Function Tests, Urinalysis and Urinalysis Case Histories,

            by Dr. Pudek

 

In this session the physiological function of the kidney, common disorders of the kidney and the role of renal function tests in assessing kidney disease will be examined. The components of routine urinalysis will also be reviewed. The laboratory assessment of renal disease will be reviewed using case examples.

 

 8 – Clinical Enzymology & Biomarkers of Cardiac Injury.

Cardiac Markers: Myocardial Infarction, by Dr. Pudek

The general properties of enzymes and how they are measured will be reviewed. The sources, clinical use and methods of measurement of alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, amylase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, creatine kinase and lipase will be discussed. Case histories will be utilized to illustrate the application of clinical Enzymology.

In part 2 of this the role of troponin I and T as markers of cardiac injury including myocardial infarction will be reviewed


This course covers the following topics:

1 – White Blood Cells, by Dr. Sigurdson

This session focuses on the origin, maturation and function of the myeloid and lymphoid white blood cells. Normal and reactive morphology as well as leukemias are examined. There is a review of the principles involved in the automated differential.

 

2 & 3 – Red Blood Cells, by Dr. Scott

2-Red blood cells play a vital role in the transport of oxygen.  Disease states such as anemia and genetic abnormalities of hemoglobin may affect this function and result in distinct morphological changes. Normal and abnormal morphology will be examined and related to abnormalities in the red cell indices.

3-Thalassemia and Anemias

 

4 - Hemostasis, by Dr. Krisinger

Hemostasis is a perfect balance between blood clot formation and fibrinolysis.  This session describes the biochemical interplay required to protect the body from catastrophic blood loss upon injury while maintaining the fluidity of blood at sites remote from injury. Imbalances can lead to thrombosis or bleeding. Techniques for the investigation of routine coagulation tests will be covered as well.

 

5 - Blood Platelets and Transfusion Science, by Dr. Schubert

Platelets play an important role in blood clotting and wound repair. This session covers basic platelet biology as well as highlights of recent scientific discoveries. Platelet functions and their analyses will be discussed especially in the light of platelet disorders. Scientific approaches will be introduced to address current challenges in blood banking affecting transfusion medicine.

 

6 – Fluid Morphology, by Dr. Manna

This session will review various fluids which are analyzed in the hematology lab and these include CSF, peritoneal, pericardial, pleural and synovial fluids.  The focus will be on cell counts and morphology and the two main objectives are: to be able to identify and differentiate among benign cells; and be able to screen for infections as well as hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies.

 

7 – Quality Assurance in the Hematology Lab, by Kin Cheng / Jim Yakimec

To ensure quality of the service provided by the laboratory, it must satisfy the needs of the ordering physicians, patients and the regulatory agency. Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) defined twelve building blocks that are essential for a quality management system. These essential building blocks must be applied across the path of workflow, from pre-examination, examination to post-examination.

Before a new instrument or methodology is introduced in the laboratory, it must be properly evaluated to validate its performance specifications. Once it is placed into clinical use, quality control tools are applied to ensure accuracy and precision of the reported results.  The final piece in a quality assurance scheme is to ensure the clients receive the results in a timely fashion.


Chemistry Exam

Course Credit Hours:

Chemistry: 26    

In determining the credit hours we consider the videos and written material within the modules, preparation and /or study time and then of course the final exam(s).

 

PASSING MARKS

¨      BCSLS Policy stipulates that a passing mark is 60% or higher.

 

 

·         In front of the invigilator you can open your computer and access the exam(s) online.

·         No books/resources are permitted during this exam.

·         The invigilator must send BCSLS the invigilator verification statement once you have completed writing the exam. 

·         After you have submitted your exam, it will take 2-4 weeks for it to be graded.

 

 


Hematology Exam

Course Credit Hours:

Hematology : 24   

In determining the credit hours we consider the videos and written material within the modules, preparation and /or study time and then of course the final exam(s).

 

PASSING MARKS

BCSLS Policy stipulates that a passing mark is 60% or higher.

 

  •  In front of the invigilator you can access the exam(s) online.
  •  No books/resources are permitted during this exam.
  •  The invigilator must send BCSLS the invigilator verification statement once you have completed writing the exam. 
  •  After you have submitted your exam, it will take 2-4 weeks for it to be graded.